Airdate: Secret Life of Predators

2013-09-12_0045Next month Nat Geo screens a new natural history series as, big cat tracker Boone Smith see the world through the eyes of a predator.

He travels to some of the world’s most unforgiving places including Africa’s savannah, Indonesia’s tropical reefs, Central America’s rainforest and India’s dry forest,

Combining cutting-edge cinematography with a surprising soundtrack of indie-rock music including Snow Patrol and The Lumineers, the four-part special delivers new and astounding stories about 45 different animal species. The very best wildlife cameramen and crews traveled to 18 countries, immersing themselves in 12 different habitats to capture extraordinary natural history footage and never-before-seen animal behaviors. They endured brutally cold temperatures at the North Pole to film polar bears and they dove deep underwater in Canada to observe the giant Pacific octopus.

Deep in the rainforest, National Geographic cameras captured the unbelievable instinctual behavior of glass frog embryos. Before they were ready to hatch, these miniscule tadpoles broke out of their eggs to seek safety from a giant wasp attack. Beneath the icy waves of Alaska, filmmakers documented killer whales performing a unique hunting technique that scientists didn’t know even existed … until now.

Secret Life of Predators examines an arsenal of powerful, bizarre and stealth-like skills using an array of state-of-the-art technology. Super-slow-motion cameras capture the deadly claw strike of a small but mighty peacock mantis shrimp. Specially mounted carcass cameras provide a unique view of cheetah cubs and orcas feeding. Underwater cameras film the wacky-looking hairy frogfish walking across the sea floor. Cameras equipped with night vision make it possible to witness a sea turtle laying her eggs.

“Wet”
The oceans of our planet are ruthless battlefields that constantly test even the deadliest carnivores. Dive beneath the icy waves of Alaska’s Aleutian Islands to witness a hunting technique rarely documented amongst killer whales. Orcas spend only moments feeding on a gray whale calf before dragging the carcass to the sea floor in order to store the meat for leaner times. Remarkably, small cameras mounted on the dead whale capture the entire process. Also explored are a carnival of smaller carnivores, including the hairy frogfish that walks along the ocean floor and dangles a fleshy “worm” lure before attacking its prey.

Premieres Sunday 6 October at 7.30pm AEDT

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.